Securitas Annual Report 2007

Car Dealer Safety Without Barriers
Car dealerships in Germany often display their vehicles in open, outdoor areas and this makes security challenging. By performing necessary research, Securitas defined dealership security needs and developed a flexible security program that saves time and money.
The car sales industry demands security solutions that are designed to protect vehicles, but at the same time allows potential buyers full access. “Fences and other protective barriers are not an option for our business. We want our customers to see and freely interact with all the cars on our lot,” explains dealership President, Timm Moll. “Therefore we needed to develop a solution that would secure the vehicles without hindering access for the potential buyer.”
Intruders had been known to trespass the car lots at night and steal a wide variety of equipment including aluminum hub-caps, exterior mirrors, navigation and stereo systems, tail lamps and even airbags. Because of a car dealership’s vast size, complete external video surveillance had proven to be inefficient and made little financial sense.
An industry survey, conducted by Securitas, revealed that the only kind of solution that could be considered was one that would be adapted to the dealership’s sales process and which could be used in a mobile mode, unlimited by location. To be fully secure, a car dealership required coverage of its entire lot, the showroom, the individual cars and all vehicle keys. As a detailed security solution was developed, it became apparent that the needed technology was not yet available on the market. To solve this, Securitas Mobile cooperated with an electronics manufacturer that offered experience and solutions to these needs.
The technological system is based on a vehicle alarm which is mounted on the window aperture of a vehicle, and then activated. Movements within or surrounding the vehicle trigger a pre-programmed acoustic alarm. Every alarm is transmitted to the Securitas central emergency and service center, and a Securitas security officer intervenes in accordance with the established action plan.
The other major challenge for car dealers was to keep track of the car keys. This need was solved by a “Key Control” safe. Each key is allocated to an electronic inventory in the safe. Each staff member is recorded via an electronic combination lock on the outer door, and the removal of keys is recorded electronically.
“I can now store vehicle keys safely away and I always know which employee has removed a specific key and when they did so. These are two enormous benefits as the changes will save the dealership a great deal of money. Tedious searching for car keys will be a thing of the past and my staff will pay extra attention to keys in their possession. The costs for changing locks because of missing keys fell to zero over the test period,” says dealership President Timm Moll.
“Fences and other protective barriers are not an option for our business. Therefore we needed to develop a solution that would secure the vehicles without hindering access for the potential buyer.”
Timm Moll, President, Autohaus Moll.
Track and Trace across Europe
Three years ago, more than 450,000 cars vanished from European streets, never to be recovered. Today, there is a 90 percent chance of getting a stolen vehicle back. Securitas can offer a stolen vehicle recovery service across 20 countries in Europe.
Track and trace systems are rapidly spreading. Today, more than 25,000 vehicles in Europe are connected to Securitas, and the company registers about 500 new vehicles every month. There is also an increasing interest among transport companies to protect attractive goods by means of a tracking device inside the load. Truck manufacturer Volvo Trucks went one step further and added the track and trace system to their own fleet management system, Dynafleet. The system assists drivers on the road, and includes features such as monitoring current location of the trucks, their fuel consumption, messages, driver times and service intervals.
“One feature was lacking in this very complete offering, and that was a solid security feature,” says Product Support Manager Pascal Claes at Volvo Trucks, Belgium. “Often, drivers have to pull over for a scheduled break in isolated parking lots, or by the road. Today, it is becoming more and more common with truck-jacking, even in broad daylight. Both the truck and the cargo are desirable goods.”
“As we explored the possibilities, we turned to Securitas that has already managed to migrate other track and trace technologies into their network. They also have the best coverage of alarm monitoring centers in Europe and the necessary expertise.”
Volvo Truck’s customers were looking for a security system that would secure the driver, the cargo and the truck, Pascal Claes explains. To meet those needs, Securitas’ system was connected to the existing fleet management system.
When there is an emergency situation, the driver can push a button in the truck, and an alarm is transmitted to the high-security Alert Services monitoring center in Brussels. Here, crisis management trained operators can through satellite positioning and mobile phone technology pinpoint a vehicles position and immediately alert local authorities.
At present a number of tracking technologies and service providers are available on the market. For Securitas, the next step will be to lead the industry towards a common technical platform. Agreeing on a common platform will likely become easier as monitoring equipment and services will become more of a standard feature. By 2011, all European vehicles will have to be equipped with a monitoring device, according to the “e-call-directive” from the European Union.
“We were looking to add a security feature to our fleet management system, Dynafleet, to increase the safety of our customers. As we explored the possibilities, we turned to Securitas that has already managed to migrate other track and trace technologies into their network.”
Pascal Claes, Product Support Manager, Volvo Trucks.
Car Dealer Safety Without Barriers
 
Car dealerships in Germany often display their vehicles in open, outdoor areas and this makes security challenging. By performing necessary research, Securitas defined dealership security needs and developed a flexible security program that saves time and money.
 
The car sales industry demands security solutions that are designed to protect vehicles, but at the same time allows potential buyers full access. “Fences and other protective barriers are not an option for our business. We want our customers to see and freely interact with all the cars on our lot,” explains dealership President, Timm Moll. “Therefore we needed to develop a solution that would secure the vehicles without hindering access for the potential buyer.”
 
Intruders had been known to trespass the car lots at night and steal a wide variety of equipment including aluminum hub-caps, exterior mirrors, navigation and stereo systems, tail lamps and even airbags. Because of a car dealership’s vast size, complete external video surveillance had proven to be inefficient and made little financial sense.
 
An industry survey, conducted by Securitas, revealed that the only kind of solution that could be considered was one that would be adapted to the dealership’s sales process and which could be used in a mobile mode, unlimited by location. To be fully secure, a car dealership required coverage of its entire lot, the showroom, the individual cars and all vehicle keys. As a detailed security solution was developed, it became apparent that the needed technology was not yet available on the market. To solve this, Securitas Mobile cooperated with an electronics manufacturer that offered experience and solutions to these needs.
 
The technological system is based on a vehicle alarm which is mounted on the window aperture of a vehicle, and then activated. Movements within or surrounding the vehicle trigger a pre-programmed acoustic alarm. Every alarm is transmitted to the Securitas central emergency and service center, and a Securitas security officer intervenes in accordance with the established action plan.
 
The other major challenge for car dealers was to keep track of the car keys. This need was solved by a “Key Control” safe. Each key is allocated to an electronic inventory in the safe. Each staff member is recorded via an electronic combination lock on the outer door, and the removal of keys is recorded electronically.
 
“I can now store vehicle keys safely away and I always know which employee has removed a specific key and when they did so. These are two enormous benefits as the changes will save the dealership a great deal of money. Tedious searching for car keys will be a thing of the past and my staff will pay extra attention to keys in their possession. The costs for changing locks because of missing keys fell to zero over the test period,” says dealership President Timm Moll.

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Track and Trace across Europe
 
Three years ago, more than 450,000 cars vanished from European streets, never to be recovered. Today, there is a 90 percent chance of getting a stolen vehicle back. Securitas can offer a stolen vehicle recovery service across 20 countries in Europe.
 
Track and trace systems are rapidly spreading. Today, more than 25,000 vehicles in Europe are connected to Securitas, and the company registers about 500 new vehicles every month. There is also an increasing interest among transport companies to protect attractive goods by means of a tracking device inside the load. Truck manufacturer Volvo Trucks went one step further and added the track and trace system to their own fleet management system, Dynafleet. The system assists drivers on the road, and includes features such as monitoring current location of the trucks, their fuel consumption, messages, driver times and service intervals.
 
“One feature was lacking in this very complete offering, and that was a solid security feature,” says Product Support Manager Pascal Claes at Volvo Trucks, Belgium. “Often, drivers have to pull over for a scheduled break in isolated parking lots, or by the road. Today, it is becoming more and more common with truck-jacking, even in broad daylight. Both the truck and the cargo are desirable goods.”
 
“As we explored the possibilities, we turned to Securitas that has already managed to migrate other track and trace technologies into their network. They also have the best coverage of alarm monitoring centers in Europe and the necessary expertise.”
 
Volvo Truck’s customers were looking for a security system that would secure the driver, the cargo and the truck, Pascal Claes explains. To meet those needs, Securitas’ system was connected to the existing fleet management system.
 
When there is an emergency situation, the driver can push a button in the truck, and an alarm is transmitted to the high-security Alert Services monitoring center in Brussels. Here, crisis management trained operators can through satellite positioning and mobile phone technology pinpoint a vehicles position and immediately alert local authorities.
 
At present a number of tracking technologies and service providers are available on the market. For Securitas, the next step will be to lead the industry towards a common technical platform. Agreeing on a common platform will likely become easier as monitoring equipment and services will become more of a standard feature. By 2011, all European vehicles will have to be equipped with a monitoring device, according to the “e-call-directive” from the European Union.